Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (OOC and Rules Stuff)

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Kavonde
Location: Bakersfield, CA
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Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (OOC and Rules Stuff)

Post by Kavonde » Thu Jul 25, 2013 2:48 am

Anyone familiar with the Ultimate Campaign book's new rules for building a kingdom? They're pretty cool, aren't they? One could almost run an entire game based on them... and man, they might even be really well-suited to a play-by-post game, with a little finagling. But you already figured that out, didn't you? (The post title was probably a tip off.) So let me just give you the sales pitch, now.

Ultimate Campaign introduces whole new systems that let PCs establish and expand nations, build up settlements, and wage full-scale wars. Kingdoms have three primary statistics: Economy, Loyalty, and Stability. Economy, naturally, reflects a kingdom's economic power, its trade, and its level of technology. Loyalty indicates how, well, loyal your people are--not just to you, but how peaceable they are to eachother and how willing they are to defend their neighbors. Stability refers to how functional the status quo is, and covers threats to the people like disease or monster raids.

Each kingdom also has its own alignment, from Lawful Good to Chaotic Evil. Lawful adds +2 Economy, Chaotic adds +2 Loyalty, Good adds +2 Loyalty, Evil adds +2 Economy, and Neutral (on both axes) adds +2 Stability.

Rather than tracking your kingdom's actual treasury, your economic might is represented as Build Points (BP). This is an abstract representation of the coins in your vault, the workers you can field, the resources you can harvest and transport where needed, and so on. Consumption is how much BP your kingdom spends every turn. (Keep in mind: you pay Consumption before you get your Income; more on the nitty-gritty later.) Unrest works similarly, but subtracts itself from all of your kingdom attribute rolls instead. Plus, if it gets too high, you start losing territory to the unwashed masses.

Kingdom size is determined by how many hexes are under its control. You can claim new ones by exploring them and then spending BP; again, more details forthcoming.

Each turn lasts approximately one month. For the purposes of this game, the order of initiative will be determined by each kingdom's Stability score.

Each kingdom's turn is divided into four phases: Upkeep, Edict, Income, and Event. I'll have more information about this in a follow-up post. (Or, you know, you could just click over to Paizo's free online wiki, which has all of the information, albeit without my personal communicative touch.)

Sadly, founding a kingdom is hard for PCs in a normal campaign to do. It's a pretty expensive and time-consuming job; most PCs won't ever have the cash or the motivation to dedicate themselves to running their very own empire. However, characters built from the ground up to become rulers... well, that might work a little better.

Of course, a kingdom needs more than just one guy in charge. There are a lot of offices to fill.

Ruler: The Head Honcho, the Big Cheese, the Whole Enchilada. Rulers may choose one of the three kingdom attributes (Economy, Loyalty, or Stability) and add their Charisma modifier to this attribute. If you manage to grow your kingdom to a size of 26, you can apply the bonus to two kingdom attributes. At 101 or more, choose three. Also, if your Ruler has the Leadership feat, the bonus from that feat gets added onto the Charisma bonus. Finally, if you have a spouse, you get to add both your Charisma modifiers. A kingdom without a Ruler can't function, and Unrest increases by 4 every Upkeep phase.

Councilor: The Councilor is the guy who makes nice to the peasants, and who brings their complaints to the Ruler. They add either their Charisma or Wisdom modifier (whichever's higher) to the kingdom's Loyalty. If you don't have a Councilor, Loyalty drops by 2 and you can't get any benefits from using a Holiday edict.

General: You can design a fancier title, if you wish, but this guy is in charge of the kingdom's military. He adds his Charisma or his Strength modifier to the kingdom's Stability. Not having a General decreases Loyalty by 4.

Grand Diplomat: The guy who visits your neighbors and makes them promise not to kill you. He adds his Charisma or Intelligence modifier to the kingdom's Stability. Not having a Grand Diplomat decreases Stability by 2, and the kingdom cannot issue Diplomatic or Exploration edicts.

Heir: Either your Ruler's eldest son or daughter, or a designated (and hopefully loyal) inheritor. If the Ruler and his/her spouse is unavailable, the Heir acts as regent... though each turn, he must succeed at a Loyalty check. She also gets to add half her Charisma modifier to Loyalty. There's no penalty for not having an heir... or at least not one the Ruler will live to see.

High Priest: Serves as a Ruler's religious adviser and follows one of Golarion's many gods. He adds his Charisma or Wisdom modifier to Stability. Not having a High Priest decreases Stability and Loyalty by 2, and increases Unrest by one every Upkeep phase.

Magister: Court wizard, or just a really smart scholar. She adds her Charisma or Intelligence to the Economy. Without her, Economy decreases by 4. (Ouch.)

Marshal: He's one of them rangers. He adds his Dexterity or Wisdom to the kingdom's Economy. Not having a Marshal drops the Economy by 4 again.

Royal Enforcer: Your kingdom's chief law enforcer/bounty hunter, the Royal Enforcer is in charge of punishing crime. He adds his Dexterity or Strength to the kingdom's Loyalty, and during the Upkeep phase, he can attempt a Loyalty check to decrease Unrest by 1. (Failure means Loyalty drops by 1 instead.) There's no penalty for not having an Enforcer, though.

Spymaster: Such songs, his little birds sing to him. During each Edict phase, the Spymaster can choose to add his Dexterity or Intelligence modifier to either Economy, Loyalty, or Stability. Not having a Spymaster decreases Economy by 4, and Unrest increases by 1 each Upkeep phase.

Treasurer: The annoying lady who tells you you can't afford another tournament this month. She adds her Intelligence or Wisdom modifier to the kingdom's Economy. Not having a Treasurer decreases your Economy by 4, and means you can't collect taxes during the Edict phase.

Warden: Kind of like the Enforcer, but not. Wardens add their Constitution or their Strength modifier to kingdom Loyalty. Not havin' one around decreases both Loyalty and Stability by 2.

That's a lot of jobs what need filling, huh? Well, there's good news and bad news. The bad news is: you're only going to get to stat out four full characters to fill those roles. The good news is: you only have to stat out four characters to fill those roles!

Character Creation Guidelines

You'll be creating four full-fledged characters. You can assign these characters to whichever Leader Role you want. Your best character doesn't necessarily have to be your Ruler; hell, you may find it beneficial that he or she not be.

Character A: Level 8 (34,000 xp). 18 point buy for stats. (Remember, Pathfinder uses a different point buy system than 3.5. Here's a calculator.) You get two Traits, as standard. This character gets 33,000 gold pieces to spend as he or she wishes, although she can't gift it to other characters, nor can she purchase equipment solely for their use. Any first-party race or class.

Character B: Level 7 (23,000 xp). 15 point buy for stats. Two Traits. 23,500 gp. Any first-party race or class.

Character C: Level 5 (10,000 xp). 15 point buy for stats. Two Traits. 10,500 gp. Any first-party race or class.

Character D: Level 5 (10,000 xp). 15 point buy for stats. Two Traits. 10,500 gp. Any first-party race or class.

(Here's a very basic character sheet made on Google Docs. Any format's fine, though--even basic text--so long as it's organized and comprehensible.)

The remaining Leader Roles for your kingdom will be filled by NPCs with DM-generated stats (though you can certainly name them, determine their races/classes, and make other reasonable requests for their generation).

Kingdom Generation Guidelines

Image

This here's the map. It's basic, I know, but it doesn't really need to be super detailed.

Brown hexes are predominantly mountainous. They can be fully explored and settled, and often have valuable veins of metal hidden within, but building on them takes a considerable amount of time.
Yellow hexes are predominantly deserts. They're more barren rock than sandy dunes here, mind you.
Green hexes are predominantly plains and fields. They're easy to settle and build on, and make good farmland.
Dark Green hexes are predominantly forest/dense woods. Often home to lurking monsters.
Olive Green hexes are predominantly marshlands. Nobody likes marshlands.
Blue hexes are lakes. There are also rivers, as you may have noticed. Almost every hex has some access to waters, but those with rivers crossing them require bridges to be built along with roads. Of course, rivers can also help with trade, so...

Each hex is approximately 12 miles (19.31 km) across, or just under 95 square miles, for scale.

Anyway! You will be choosing one hex, anywhere on that map, to establish your first Settlement. To simplify things a bit, we're going to eschew the grid system the book recommends, so don't worry about having to flex your artistic muscles. (Unless you want to!) None of the initial settlements may be closer than two hexes to eachother. If people pick invalid spots, I'll roll some dice behind my virtual DM screen to pick who gets to stay and who has to move on.

The hex you put your Settlement in, as well as each hex immediately adjacent to that one, will be considered Explored. (This will allow you to Claim the hex during the Edicts phase. It will also reveal any valuable resources the hex contains.)

This Settlement will have one free basic building of your choice (IE, no Tier 2 or 3 buildings like Academies or Universities), costing up to 30 BP. You will also have 40 BP to spend on additional buildings. (These will start the game already built, natch.) Any of this BP not spent on initial buildings will be wasted; spend wisely.

(Here's a handy list of building types and BP prices, until I can write up my own.)

Each kingdom's Treasury will start with an additional 50 BP, to be spent or saved normally.

So What Are You Doing Here, Anyway?

The Vale of Tears was once home with a prosperous, if small, nation of elves and gnomes joined together in common appreciation of nature and beauty and other such things. At some point, unfortunately, they were mysteriously wiped out--as they were rather isolationist, no one really knew why--and over the centuries, their beautiful cities and graceful towers crumbled into ruin. The Vale remained largely forgotten and untouched for hundreds of years... until explorers from Cheliax, Andoran, and Absalom all stumbled into it at almost exactly the same time. They brought back word that the Vale was rich with fertile lands and hidden treasures, and suddenly, a full-scale land rush was underway.

You are representatives of one of the Inner Sea's great nations. Or maybe you're a noble yourself, cashing in the family fortune for a chance to found a glorious new dynasty. Or maybe you're a band of adventurers looking for a stronghold to call your own. Maybe you're a clan of drow or duergar, skulking up from the Darklands to establish a beachhead on the surface. Your reasons for being here are up to you, but one thing is certain: you've staked a claim to part of the Vale, and you're not giving it up without a fight.

Okay, Now Without the Fluff.

Four players are going to build their own little kingdoms/duchies/empires/tribal societies/whatever in the Vale. They're going to interact with eachother, make war on eachother, use dirty tricks to sabotage eachothers' plans, make alliances, break alliances, and generally pursue whatever their individual agendas are. On each player's turn, a random Event--often bad--will happen, and that's where I come in. Additionally, if I think the game could use some spice, I'll throw in a non-random event of my own devising. Like, say, a dragon settling into a new lair, or a freak magical storm showering the Vale in gelatinous cubes.

Typically, PCs would still be adventuring while using the Kingdom rules, and would be going off on their own to explore new areas and clear dungeons. However, I'm going to take a page from games like Crusader Kings II and Romance of the Three Kingdoms X and streamline those events considerably, basing the outcome on player choices--and on the stats of the characters they send to deal with things.

Basically, think of this as a (hopefully) long-running sandbox strategy game with wizards and paladins.

Feeling excited? Then sign up! Sadly, if more than four people sign up, not everybody's getting in. I'm going to lean heavily in favor of "first come, first served," but other factors--reliability, chiefly--will be considered as well.

Anyway! If you're interested, post a reply, and give me a basic synopsis of what your kingdom and your four user-generated PCs are going to be like. Nothing too detailed, of course. I'll even take "evil orcs who want to smash everything."

Post here or PM me if you have any questions!
Last edited by Kavonde on Tue Jul 30, 2013 7:05 pm, edited 5 times in total.
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GragSmash

Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by GragSmash » Thu Jul 25, 2013 3:12 am

Setting a little marker here to indicate interest.

Any guidelines on character creation?
Traiden
Location: Traveling

Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by Traiden » Thu Jul 25, 2013 4:29 am

I shall stake a claim for the Great Merchant Empire of Havenstead.

The rest shall just be details to be added as they need added. Work in progress.

The Empire of Havenstead

Capital: Cambridge. The sprawling capital of Cambridge is the heart of the Merchant Empire of Havenstead.

Races: Humans and minor representations of the other races.

Alignment: Lawful Neutral. The Great Merchant Empire of Havenstead is a trade Empire and aspiring hub of trade and commerce.

Social Organization: The higher echelons of society is ruled primarily by the merchant class working closely with the Nobles over them who control the Army

Starting Assets:
Buildings:
Town Hall (Free)
Piers (16 BP)
House (3 BP)
Shop (8 BP)
Shrine (8 BP)
Park (4 BP)
Tenement (1 BP)

Notable Characters (ie PCs):

=Lord Davhand Serpenthelm the Rising Hawk= (Ruler): Human Wizard Lawful Good
=Alithyra Tarmikos the Scribe= (Spymaster): Human Rogue Lawful Evil. Elder sister to Graril, raised to noble rankings for perfectly legitimate reasons and is no way blackmailing prominent merchants around the Empire.
=Graril Tarmikos the Messenger= (Grand Diplomat): Human Rogue Lawful Good. Younger brother and Bastard child of the Tarmikos bloodline, rose to prominence and often sent away to broker peace with rather unpleasant people. Was able to do so each time.
=Walros Droverson the Scribe= (Treasurer): Human Fighter Lawful Evil. Tax Collector and close childhood friend to Lord Davhand, chosen for his skill and loyalty to his allies and truthfulness.

Image
Last edited by Traiden on Thu Jul 25, 2013 1:34 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Lachlan the Sane
Location: I come from the land down under, where women blow and men chunder

Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by Lachlan the Sane » Thu Jul 25, 2013 4:36 am

So wait... are we all participating to build a single kingdom, or are we going to be playing as competing kingdoms?
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Kavonde
Location: Bakersfield, CA
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Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by Kavonde » Thu Jul 25, 2013 4:46 am

Whew. Okay, just added a bunch of information.

Grag: Yup! See above.

Lachlan: You're all building separate kingdoms, competing for a limited area.
RedSun
Location: Hayward, CA

Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by RedSun » Thu Jul 25, 2013 4:54 am

Formally signing up. Please note, I'm am going to take friggin' eons developing every minute detail of my civ; in fact, a due date would probably help me be decisive. I designed like five PCs for Hollow Shades alone.
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Lachlan the Sane
Location: I come from the land down under, where women blow and men chunder

Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by Lachlan the Sane » Thu Jul 25, 2013 4:54 am

Okay, yeah, I'm in for this. I'm thinking that it shall be founded and settled by Tengu and Dwarves. I believe I shall dub my kingdom the Consortium of the Earth and Sky. My capital city will be located on the mountain hex at the source of the southern river.
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Kavonde
Location: Bakersfield, CA
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Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by Kavonde » Thu Jul 25, 2013 5:01 am

RedSun wrote:Formally signing up. Please note, I'm am going to take friggin' eons developing every minute detail of my civ; in fact, a due date would probably help me be decisive. I designed like five PCs for Hollow Shades alone.


Heh, that's actually a really good idea, and I probably should've thought of it.

I'll stop taking new submissions Saturday evening, around 10:00 PM PST. So have your synopses in by then!

Character sheets and kingdom stats will take some work, and I have finals next week, so I'm not going to set a hard deadline just yet. But the sooner, the better!
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Lachlan the Sane
Location: I come from the land down under, where women blow and men chunder

Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by Lachlan the Sane » Thu Jul 25, 2013 5:53 am

Here are the basics of the Consortium:

Capital: Halfcastle. An old Elven ruin, built into the side of a mountain, and formerly the central point of a vast war between Tengu tribes, now conquered and unified by Pater Hagen. The Tengu live in the exposed ruins, which they use as staging points for their (ungainly) flight, while the Dwarves have been excavating tunnels deeper into the mountain.

Races: Dwarves, Tengu.

Alignment: Lawful Neutral. The Consortium will bargain with other kingdoms, but never deeply respect them, and has no qualms about warfare as a means to get what it wants. It does, however, have a great deal of respect for its own citizens, and will treat those who serve it with loyalty well.

Social organisation: Ungainly. Hagen is head of both the church and the state. Hagen's father Alberich is worshipped as a patron deity, and the worship of other gods is forbidden. Government is achieved by an Assembly of Dwarven and Tengu clans, although all they can really do is make suggestions for Hagen to implement. Young dwarves and tengu are expected to work for the clan as indentured apprentices until they come of age; everything that apprentices produce goes to their clan, and in exchange their clan feeds and houses them. When they come of age, the young ones are raised to journeymen, and may profit from their own endeavours. Tengu and Dwarves are roughly equal in social status, although the Dwarves are a little better off, and less likely to be prosecuted by the kingdom's harsh justice system.

Starting Assets: While we may be on the run from the old Dwarven kingdoms, the Consortium of Earth and Sky is still full of dwarves, and dwarves always come prepared. My starting cash will be spent on equipment for my people; tools and weapons for most of the population (we're dwarves, so they're the same thing), and plenty of edible mushrooms to start some underground farms. A reasonable number of dwarves and tengu (about 5% of the population) will have military-grade equipment and serve in the standing army and/or police forces. Building-wise, let's start with a blacksmith and a stonemason (dwarves!).

Notable Characters (ie PCs):

Pater Hagen (Ruler): Lawful Evil Dwarf Oracle/Sorcerer. Hagen's father Alberich was banished by the Dwarves for the practice of forbidden magics and grand blasphemy. Alberich gathered great magical forces and convinced many of the younger dwarf clans to join him in revolution, and the only way the old Dwarven kingdom could defeat him was to seek the aid of the great dragon Fafner. Fafner promised to help in exchange for every magical item Alberich carried. The Dwarven kingdom was ravaged, but Alberich was eventually killed, and Fafner extracted his price. Hagen, Alberich's bastard son, was charismatic enough to lead some of his father's remaining dwarves away to the Vale, and conquered a warring group of Tengu to establish a city. Hagen wishes to carve out his own personal kingdom in the Vale, and seeks vengeance on both the old Dwarven kingdom and on Fafner, who he suspects may be found somewhere in the Vale.

Lord Assassin Grawkus (Spymaster): Neutral Evil Tengu Rogue/Assassin. Grawkus is the head of Hagen's secret police and reports directly to him. The state formally denies his existence, and claiming that he does exist is not healthy.

Kreebik the Sycophant (Grand Diplomat): Lawful Neutral Tengu Bard. Managed to pull the strings on most of the Tengu clans prior to their conquering simply by sucking up to everyone who had more power than him. Now he sucks up to Hagen instead. Hagen is getting a bit sick of this and wants to send him away to make (strictly temporary) treaties with anybody else who's poking around the Vale.

Lord Engineer Mime (Magister): True Neutral Dwarf (Alchemist? I want to go with Artificer, but that class doesn't exist in Pathfinder). Hagen's uncle, Alberich's brother. A master of all the dwarven arts of smithing, mining, engineering, and craftsmanship, and a dab hand at the forging of magical items, Mime is now ancient and frail. Mime was responsible for the creation of a great many of Alberich's treasures, under constant threat of violence from his brother. Mime is easily cowed and will do almost anything Hagen demands -- nobody is sure if he can even tell the difference between Hagen and Alberich. Mime only truly comes alive when he is supervising a new work of craftsmanship, and there is a lot of work for him to do to establish this new kingdom.

Here's where the Consortium is. I did this really quickly and badly. Please make it look better.

Image
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Sudanna

Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by Sudanna » Thu Jul 25, 2013 2:30 pm

I was gonna do this, but after looking for twenty minutes, making characters in Pathfinder is a ridiculous pain in the ass. Nope.

I could see making one character for an RPG, but making four for a wargame? Nope.
PossiblyInsane

Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by PossiblyInsane » Thu Jul 25, 2013 3:20 pm

I think I'll give this a try. Characters to be put in this spot later.
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mwchase
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Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by mwchase » Thu Jul 25, 2013 3:40 pm

I'm probably not going to do this, but I just wanted to say that this:
Lachlan the Mad wrote:So wait... are we all participating to build a single kingdom, or are we going to be playing as competing kingdoms?
Reminded me of some descriptions I've seen of League of Legends as compared to, say, Starcraft.
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Kavonde
Location: Bakersfield, CA
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Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by Kavonde » Thu Jul 25, 2013 3:59 pm

Nalyd wrote:I was gonna do this, but after looking for twenty minutes, making characters in Pathfinder is a ridiculous pain in the ass. Nope.

I could see making one character for an RPG, but making four for a wargame? Nope.


Yeah, I can understand that being a tall order. If you're fairly familiar with the system, making characters isn't that much of an ordeal, but as a newcomer it can be pretty overwhelming.

Lachlan the Mad wrote:Lord Engineer Mime (Magister): True Neutral Dwarf (Alchemist? I want to go with Artificer, but that class doesn't exist in Pathfinder). Hagen's uncle, Alberich's brother. A master of all the dwarven arts of smithing, mining, engineering, and craftsmanship, and a dab hand at the forging of magical items, Mime is now ancient and frail. Mime was responsible for the creation of a great many of Alberich's treasures, under constant threat of violence from his brother. Mime is easily cowed and will do almost anything Hagen demands -- nobody is sure if he can even tell the difference between Hagen and Alberich. Mime only truly comes alive when he is supervising a new work of craftsmanship, and there is a lot of work for him to do to establish this new kingdom.


I'm inclined to make an exception and allow Artificers. They're an interesting class, and Pathfinder doesn't really have an equivalent. (Alchemist comes sort of close, as does the Arcane Crafter sub-school, but they don't quite have the same flavor.)
Traiden
Location: Traveling

Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by Traiden » Thu Jul 25, 2013 4:06 pm

I have been trying to make the characters but this being a work computer I can not make that much headway into it. I have four Google Docs with the barebones of the characters set up but I can not access them here to do things to it that can be done without the books. So I might be a little late on getting everything 100% completed for it.

On a different note, is my selection of building acceptable?
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krellen
Location: The City in New Mexico
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Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by krellen » Thu Jul 25, 2013 4:09 pm

I kind of want to give this a try, but I'm not sure I'll have the time to get something done by the deadline.
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Draxom

Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by Draxom » Thu Jul 25, 2013 4:32 pm

I would like to try this, though i doubt I'll be done in time for the deadline(and you seem to have enough players as it is). One question though:

What do you mean tier 1 buildings(for the free building)? does that mean a building with no prerequisites? So a palace(which requires no prerequisites to build) would be tier 1, while a house(which requires a tenement) would be tier 2.
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Kavonde
Location: Bakersfield, CA
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Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by Kavonde » Thu Jul 25, 2013 5:50 pm

Additional Information to be Aware Of

(I'm making this a separate post, rather than editing it into the original, because while I'm not entirely certain what the character limit per post is, I'm pretty sure I'm nearing it.)

Kingdom Checks and Control DCs

During your kingdom's turn, you'll likely have to make multiple Kingdom Checks. These are simply d20 rolls with the appropriate kingdom attribute (Economy, Loyalty, or Stability) added to it, plus any additional modifiers as the situation warrants.

The difficulty of these rolls is determined by the kingdom's Control DC. This is calculated as such: 20 + the number of hexes Claimed by the kingdom + the number of buildings in your settlements divided by 9 + any other modifiers from special circumstances or events.

Example: Sir Trevor Crownriver needs to make a Stability check to keep his kingdom functional after his "Weasel Stomping Day" Holiday edict failed to rally the positive response he was hoping for. He controls 12 hexes, in which there are three settlements with a combined total of 23 buildings. The DC for his Stability check will thus be 20 + 12 + 2 (23/9 rounded down) + 5 (because Weasel Stomping Day was really unpopular), for a total of 39. Since his kingdom's total Stability bonus is only +23, he'd better hope the dice are with him.

Turns and Phases

As stated above, there are four phases in each kingdom's turn. (Plus, a potential fifth, in the case of warfare.)

Phase 1 - Upkeep
Step 1: Determine Kingdom Stability - Attempt a Stability check versus your kingdom's Control DC. On a success, Unrest decreases by 1. (If Unrest is already at 0, add 1 BP to your treasury instead.) If you fail by 4 or less, Unrest increases by 1. If you fail by 5 or more, Unrest increases by 1d4. Remember: Unrest is subtracted from all of your kingdom attribute rolls, including this one.
Step 2: Pay Consumption - Time to shell out the BP for all those fancy buildings and armies. If your treasury hits a negative value after paying Consumption, Unrest increases by 2.
Step 3: Fill Vacant Magic Item Slots - Some buildings, like Temples or Bardic Colleges, produce magic items for your kingdom. We'll discuss this more below; it's not totally automatic.
Step 4: Modify Unrest - Unrest increases by 1 for each kingdom attribute that is a negative number. This is also when the Royal Enforcer can make his roll to decrease Unrest (at the potential risk of decreasing Loyalty).

Phase 2 - Edicts
Step 1: Assign Leadership - If you have a Leader Role that needs filling, or if you want to swap jobs around, this happens here.
Step 2: Explore, Claim, and/or Abandon Hexes - Assign folks to explore a new hex, or claim one you've already explored and cleared of baddies. (More information below.) You can also abandon claimed hexes, if you find yourself struggling to keep your kingdom's head above water.
Step 3: Build Terrain Improvements - You can spend your BP here to build hex improvements like farms, forts, roads, mines, and quarries. You can also clear a site to begin constructing a new settlement. (More information below.)
Step 4: Create and Improve Settlement - If you've previously cleared space for a new settlement, you can start building it now. You can also build new buildings within the settlements that you already have. (As always, more information below.)
Step 5: Create Armies - Pretty much what it says. A lot more information will be forthcoming.
Step 6: Issue Edicts - Isn't that what you've been doing? Well, these are the super special shiny Edicts with a capital E. More information, naturally, below.

Phase 3 - Income
Step 1: Make Withdrawals - You probably shouldn't do this. 1 BP = 2,000 gp, and every BP you withdraw increases Unrest by 1. But, if you really want that +5 Flaming Axiomatic Greatsword of Sundering...
Step 2: Make Deposits - Responsible leaders, instead, deposit money. Every 4,000 gp you donate increases BP by 1.
Step 3: Sell Expensive Items for BP - Insane leaders pawn their valuable magical artifacts for sweet, sweet infrastructure. Items worth more than 4,000 gp can be sold for BP. Divide its retail price by half (as if selling normally), then divide what's left by 4,000 (rounded down). That's how much BP you'll get for it.
Step 4: Collect Taxes - Make an Economy roll. (Not a check; no chance of failure.) Subtract Unrest. Divide the result by 3, and add that much BP to your treasury. Cha-ching!

Phase 4a - Combat!
This will require some further detail, but here's the basics.

To streamline things for a PbP setting, we'll have four "rounds" of combat each turn. Each round will represent approximately a week's worth of marching, maneuvering, waiting nervously, and occasionally actually fighting. If an army has to move 6 hexes or more to reach the site of battle, they can attempt a Forced March (more on that later), or just have three rounds of battle this turn instead of four. Reinforcements from other rulers will arrive 1d4 rounds into the battle.

There's a whole section of Ultimate Campaign dedicated to the new mass combat rules; I'll give as much detail as I can stand, but here's the full rundown.

Phase 4b - Events
There's a 25% chance each turn that a kingdom will have a random Event happen. If no Event happened the previous turn, however, that chance increases to 75%. Events can be both beneficial and, well, not.

This is also when I might decide to drop a rift to the 457th layer of the Abyss in the middle of your throne room, so be warned.

Exploring and Claiming Hexes

As each hex represents roughly 95 square miles of terrain, fully exploring one is a bit of an undertaking, and certainly not without risk. You have a few options on how to go about it, of course...

Send a Leader to do it. You can assign one (or more) of your leader-type-people to explore a hex for you. Characters with ranks in Survival will have a better chance of coming across beneficial special events while avoiding bad ones, but any character with real class levels can be relied on to explore. However, explorers are putting their lives in danger to do so; many hexes already have inhabitants, and they might not appreciate your intrusion. This could mean combat, or a chance to persuade a few of the natives to join you, or a peace treaty formally recognizing their independence... whatever approach you take, it will be up to you. These events will be handled via PM, and a summary will be posted in the Turn thread.

Send some mooks to do it. You could also just send a troop of soldiers or civilians out, if you really can't be bothered. They have a chance of failing to fully explore the hex, however, as well as higher-than-average chances of running into something big, spiky, and hungry.

Send both! Finally, you could put a Leader in charge of some troops and send them out together. You'll definitely succeed in exploring, but you'll retain the higher-than-average chance of finding something unfriendly.

So why not just send your Leaders out by themselves? Well, two reasons, mainly. One, they might get themselves killed. Losing a few soldiers isn't anyone's idea of a good day, but having your Ruler get eaten by a dragon is going to cause some serious problems. Two, some of the events your Leader might run into could keep them away from home for awhile, and a Leader needs to spend at least seven days out of the month doing paperwork and bossing around subordinates if the kingdom wants to get the benefit of their position.

Of course, should you run into something you don't think you or your men can handle, you (almost) always have the choice of backing off and going home. The hex will remain unexplored, but you'll have a better idea of what you're heading into, and can mount a more appropriate expedition next turn.

Once a hex has been explored, and any hostile creatures you've discovered have been cleared out, you can Claim the hex during the same Edicts phase. (Or the next one, if you prefer, though after awhile, something nasty might move back in.) From there, you can improve it with farms and roads and such, build a new settlement there, or just preserve it for the pretty scenery. It's your kingdom, man.

Improving Hexes
There are a variety of ways you can improve the hexes in your kingdom.

Aqueduct: Brings water from high places to low places. A chain of aqueducts must connect from a mountain hex to a settlement hex in order to provide any benefit. Cost: As road, though cost isn't doubled for crossing a river (see below). Benefit: (on completion) Loyalty +1, Stability +1, allows connected settlement(s) on Desert tiles to build water-dependent buildings.

Canal: A wide, artificial waterway that allows large ships to pass through it. Terrain: Desert or Plain. Cost: Twice the cost of a road. Benefit: Settlements in a hex with a Canal treat the hex as if it had a river.

Farm: Whatever kind of farm you can imagine, from wheat to apple orchards. Eeyup. Terrain: Desert (with canal), plains. Benefit: Each Farm decreases Consumption by 2. Cost: 2 BP in Plains, 8 BP in Desert.

Fishery: Like a farm, but with fish. Terrain: Along a river or canal, marsh. [i]Benefit: Decreases Consumption by 1. Cost: 4 BP.

Fort: A fortified, walled encampment outside of a settlement. Terrain: Any land. Benefit: Stability +2, Defense +4 (applies to armies based within it), Unrest decreases by 1 when completed. If a Settlement is built on this hex, this improvement counts as a Barracks and a Stables. Drawbacks: +1 Consumption. Cost: 24 BP.

Highway: Sort of the opposite of a danger zone. Upgraded and improved Road. Terrain: Any hex with a Road. Effect: Economy +1 for every 4 hexes of Highway you control; Stability +1 for every 8 hexes; provides bonus on Forced March rolls. (Essentially, Highways double Road bonuses.) Cost: 8 BP/hex in Deserts, 4 BP/hex in Forest, 8 BP/hex in Marshes, 8 BP/hex in Mountains, 2 BP/hex in Plains.

Mine: Used to extract things from the earth, from metals to salt or sulfur. Terrain: Any land. Benefit: Economy +1, earn +1 BP when collecting taxes (in addition to usual results). Cost: 6 BP.

Quarry: Like it's cousin, but more... open-mineded. Terrain: Any land. Benefit: Stability +1, earn +1 BP when collecting taxes. Cost: 6 BP.

Road: Connects your settlements and brings people together. Terrain: Any land. Benefit: Economy +1 for every 4 hexes of Road, Stability +1 for every 8 hexes of Road; bonus to Forced March rolls. Cost:4 BP/hex in Deserts, 2 BP/hex in Forests, 4 BP/hex in Marshes, 4 BP/hex in Mountains, 1BP/hex in Plains.

Sawmill: Ya cuts down trees, ya eats yas lunch, yas like to press wild flowers... Terrain: Forest. Benefit: Stability +1, earn +1 BP when collecting taxes. Cost: 3 BP.

Watchtower: Watches the frontier, and provides a safe place for your patrols to rest. No reason to get excited. Terrain: Any land. Benefit: Stability +1, Defense +2; Unrest decreases by 1 when completed. If a Settlement is built on the same hex, this improvement counts as a Watchtower building. Upgrades: Can be expanded into a Fort. Cost: 12 BP.

There are also various types of Special Hexes. These give various benefits, depending on what they are.

Free City: A pre-existing Settlement that isn't part of any larger kingdom. They can be conquered with an army, or with both a successful Diplomacy check by one of your Leaders and a successful kingdom Stability check (versus the Control DC).

Lair: A network of caves, a defensible shelter, a series of dwellings carved into the side of a cliff, whatever. These always have fairly nasty monsters that need cleaning out, but once Claimed, they provide a bonus to the Defense of any Watchtowers (+1), Forts (+2), or Settlements (+4) built on that hex.

Landmark: A beautiful or imposing natural, distinctive feature found with the hex. Claiming a hex with a Landmark increases Loyalty by 1. If the hex also has a Road or Highway, Loyalty increases by an additional +1.

Resource: This hex contains a valuable resource of some kind that provides your kingdom a +1 Economy bonus. Though the resources will be specifically labelled, building any improvement in a hex with a Resource increases that improvement's Benefits by 1.

River: Rivers allow water travel through your kingdom, which helps with trade. As with Roads, every four hexes with a River in them (even if they are not adjacent) provide +1 Economy, and every eight river hexes provide +1 Stability.

Ruin: A remnant of the long-dead people who inhabited the Vale. Almost always home to something unfriendly and potentially pretty dangerous. If a Ruin is used as the foundation of a new settlement, you can use it as the basis for a new building, reducing its cost by half. Alternatively, you could salvage building materials and such from the ruin, reducing the cost of the next three buildings in that hex by 1d4 BP each.

Building a New Settlement

In order to build a new settlement, you need to do the following:

1) Explore, clear, and Claim the hex.
2) Prepare the site for construction.
3) Start building!

We've already covered the first, so let's look at the second.

Preparing a site for construction is a long, tough, and sometimes expensive process... except on plains. It takes a certain number of months (turns) to clear the site and get everything ready for human(oid) habitation. There's also an upfront BP cost you'll have to pay to get the laborers out to the site and working. Each terrain type has its own preparation time and BP cost.

Desert: 1 month of preparation time, 4 BP prep cost.
Forest: 2 months of preparation time, 4 BP prep cost.
Marsh: 3 months of preparation time, 8 BP prep cost.
Mountains: 4 months of preparation time, 12 BP prep cost.
Plains: 0 months of preparation time, 1 BP cost.

Once the foundation of your new Settlement is laid, you can begin constructing buildings.

Settlement Buildings

More on this coming! In the meantime, here's a list and lots of other information.

Whew. I need a break. This is a lot of typing, y'know?
Last edited by Kavonde on Thu Jul 25, 2013 6:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Kavonde
Location: Bakersfield, CA
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Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by Kavonde » Thu Jul 25, 2013 6:01 pm

Traiden wrote:On a different note, is my selection of building acceptable?


Yup, you're good! Thanks for not taking advantage of the obvious, glaring exploit I left in there.

Draxom wrote:I would like to try this, though i doubt I'll be done in time for the deadline(and you seem to have enough players as it is). One question though:

What do you mean tier 1 buildings(for the free building)? does that mean a building with no prerequisites? So a palace(which requires no prerequisites to build) would be tier 1, while a house(which requires a tenement) would be tier 2.


Yeah, that was not well-considered; I forgot about the Palace. So now I mean a Tier 1 building costing up to 30 BP. (But, yeah, you'll still need Tenements before Houses.)

Also, all I want by Saturday night are ideas. No need to stat out every character and aspect of your kingdom yet. (And looking at the map, it might be kinda fun to squeeze in one or two more players... )

krellen wrote:I kind of want to give this a try, but I'm not sure I'll have the time to get something done by the deadline.


Same goes for you, though I know you're pretty damned busy all-around.
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krellen
Location: The City in New Mexico
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Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by krellen » Thu Jul 25, 2013 6:09 pm

Kavonde wrote:Also, all I want by Saturday night are ideas. No need to stat out every character and aspect of your kingdom yet. (And looking at the map, it might be kinda fun to squeeze in one or two more players... )

In that case, I'm kind of interested in forming a settlement in that forest hex by the tri-hex lake near the middle of the map. Folks would be fishers, hunters and farmers, mostly simple folk. Probably a Neutral Good or Lawful Good settlement. I might make it a little weird by making it something like a halfling/lizardfolk community, though I'm not sure how much Pathfinder changed those races from base DnD.
Last edited by krellen on Thu Jul 25, 2013 6:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Akri

Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by Akri » Thu Jul 25, 2013 6:10 pm

I'm definitely not going to be participating (don't have the attention span for creating a city and characters and all that jazz) but I'll be following along with interest.
Traiden
Location: Traveling

Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by Traiden » Thu Jul 25, 2013 6:14 pm

I propose a trade agreement between the Havenstead Empire with the Consortium, Lachlan.
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Anster
Location: Odessa

Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by Anster » Thu Jul 25, 2013 6:16 pm

Akri wrote:I'm definitely not going to be participating (don't have the attention span for creating a city and characters and all that jazz) but I'll be following along with interest.


What she just wrote
Traiden
Location: Traveling

Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by Traiden » Thu Jul 25, 2013 8:04 pm

I did a brief run of some numbers and there is quite a lot of negatives here. Is there any way to fill these empty slots in our Court? I am going to have assassins at my neck from my own people at this rate of Loyalty -10
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Kavonde
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Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by Kavonde » Thu Jul 25, 2013 8:14 pm

Traiden wrote:I did a brief run of some numbers and there is quite a lot of negatives here. Is there any way to fill these empty slots in our Court? I am going to have assassins at my neck from my own people at this rate of Loyalty -10


I'll be filling all the empty slots with NPCs for ya. You can name them and request certain races and classes or whatnot, but they'll be working with a simple NPC array of stats.

Opportunities to recruit more capable Leaders will arise in-game.
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Lachlan the Sane
Location: I come from the land down under, where women blow and men chunder

Re: Pathfinder: Settling the Vale of Tears (Recruitment thre

Post by Lachlan the Sane » Fri Jul 26, 2013 12:48 am

Hmm, okay, buildings for a Dwarf settlement. Note that, although I put Halfcastle in some Elven ruins, they've long been picked clean by the Tengu -- I don't expect to take any of the benefits or penalties for building stuff on ruins, okay?

So my starting buildings;

Barracks (6BP)
Brewery (6BP)
Foundry (my free building)
Smithy (6BP)
Shrine (8BP)
Tavern (12BP)
Tenement x2 (2BP)
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